All Events

AUTHOR ANDREW GULLIFORD: THE WOOLLY WEST

Date: 

 Sunday, August 19, 2018 - 7:00pm

Place: 

 Library Hall

Exploring the history of Colorado's hidden sheepscapes

Tales of cowboys and cattlemen dominate western history—and even more so in popular culture. But in the competition for grazing lands, the sheep industry was as integral to the history of the American West as any trail drive. Author and historian Andrew Gulliford explores the sheep industry’s place in the history of Colorado and the American West in his new book, The Woolly West.

With vivid, elegant, and reflective prose, Gulliford explores the origins of sheep grazing in the region, the often-violent conflicts between the sheep and cattle industries, the creation of national forests, and ultimately the segmenting of grazing allotments with the passage of the Taylor Grazing Act of 1934. Deeper into the 20th century, Gulliford grapples with the challenges of ecological change and the politics of immigrant labor. And in the present day, as the public lands of the West are increasingly used for recreation, conflicts between hikers and dogs guarding flocks are again putting the sheep industry on the defensive.

Gulliford weaves in accounts of his personal interaction with what he calls the “sheepscape” — that is, the sheepherders’ landscape itself. Here he visits with Peruvian immigrant herders and Mormon families who have grazed sheep for generations, explores delicately balanced stone cairns assembled by shepherds now long gone, and ponders the meaning of arborglyphs carved into unending aspen forests.

The Woolly West is the first book in decades devoted to the sheep industry and breaks new ground in the history of the Colorado Basque, Greek, and Hispano shepherding families whose ranching legacies continue to the present day.

Books will be available for sale and author signing courtesy of Off the Beaten Path Bookstore.

 

 

 

 

LOCAL AUTHOR CESARE F. ROSATI, THE ACCIDENTAL PRESIDENT

Thursday, August 30th 6-8 PM

Off the Beaten Path is proud to host local author Cesare F. Rosati, with his new novel The Accidental President. Once again, Rosati dives into the politics of Washington, D.C. and the reader cannot resist following newswoman Maggie Pierce into the depths of an enlarging quagmire. As the Republican National Convention approaches, one of Ohio Senator George Cranston’s interns contacts Maggie about his discovery that the senator had rigged the bidding process for the upcoming high-speed rail project in California. Two weeks later the young man’s body is found, another unsolved homicide on the city’s list, and the players in Rosati’s newest novel converge. As the diverse collection of Presidential candidates struggle for the nomination, Maine’s votes remain uncommitted until their senator places himself on the ballot as a write-in candidate. Amid the crosscurrents of political infighting, this fast-moving story travels the streets of Washington, D.C. With a rare double vision, the author parallels past and present. Chapter by chapter, the spotlight brightens on the new president.

 

 

 

AUTHOR JENNIFER ACKERMAN: THE GENIUS OF BIRDS

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Date: 

 Thursday, August 30, 2018 - 7:00pm

Place: 

 Library Hall

An evening with New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Ackerman, celebrating the 2018 Yampa Valley Crane Festival!

In The Genius of Birds, Ackerman explores the new view of birds as "thinkers"—cunning, playful, witty, greedy, cranky, joyful, competitive.  It looks at the intelligence of birds within the context of easily observed behavior in our own surroundings and brings to it the latest science from lab and field.

If you were to divide the animal world into the smart and the not-so-smart, you might put birds squarely in the ‘dim bulb’ category.  For decades, people have written off birds as largely witless, driven solely by instinct, and their brains as primitive, capable of only the simplest mental processes.  But it is not so.  In recent years, science has discovered that birds are much, much more intelligent than we ever supposed, capable of abstract thinking, problem-solving, remembering, learning by example (as children do), recognizing faces, even conversing in a meaningful way—all with a packet of brain so tiny it would fit inside a walnut. 

These tiny brains, it turns out, are mostly made of sophisticated information processing systems that work in much the same way as our own cerebral cortex.  (Apparently there are more ways than one to wire an intelligent brain.)  Ravens, crows, even hummingbirds do things that are just plain smart—and funny and sneaky and deceitful. They craft and use tools, sing to one another in regional accents, make complex navigational decisions without asking for directions, remember where they put things using intricate geometrical concepts, understand the mental state of another individual, josh around with windshield wipers, and use rolling car tires to crack walnuts, all sorts of intelligent behavior that we can see in evidence in our own backyards, at our birdfeeders, in parks, city streets, and country skies.

Written in a lighthearted but highly informative style, with lyrical and entertaining descriptions of birds, their behavior, and their world, the book is packed with interesting new science that will appeal to a broad range of readers, including sophisticated bird lovers, nature enthusiasts and anyone interested in the brain or animal behavior. 

Books will be available for sale and signing courtesy of Off the Beaten Path Bookstore.

 

 

 

 

STORYTIME WITH CHILDREN'S AUTHOR SUE MATEER, CASSIDY'S PRESENT

Saturday, September 8th 1-3 PM

Join us at Off the Beaten Path for a atorytime afternoon with children's author, Sue Mateer, and her book Cassidy's Present. Cassidy is a playful pup who likes the smell of flowers, the feel of the warm sun, and the taste of a snowflake on her tongue. Her human friends, Anna and Charlie, seem too distracted by the cares and concerns of their everyday life to join Cassidy as she frolics through the seasons. Follow Cassidy's friends as they slowly learn to appreciate the present moment and everything it has to offer. This is Cassidy's ultimate present to us all. Fun for the whole family!

 

 

 

LITERARY SOJOURN

Join OTBP at the annual Literary Sojourn is an annual festival of authors and readers celebrating the power of the book. Each fall, an esteemed slate of authors and 500 book lovers from all over the country gather in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Together they revel in the written word, fueled by award-winning writers who share the stories and inspiration behind their exceptional books.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON LITERARY SOJOURN 2018

 

 

 

AUTHOR CRAIG CHILDS, ATLAS OF THE LOST WORLD: TRAVELS IN ICE AGE AMERICA

Craig Childs, author of Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America

Bud Werner Memorial Library @ 6:30 PM

An evening with the award-winning author of Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America, a vivid travelogue through prehistory that traces the arrival of the first people in North America at least 20,000 years ago and the artifacts that tell of their lives and fates.
Where did the First People come from?  Who were they?  What did they find when they arrived here?  Atlas of a Lost World seeks to answer these questions in a startlingly vivid, ruminative and personal journey through prehistory. Tracing the arrival of the First People in North America and the distant animals and landscapes they would have encountered, Childs takes us to back in time to fully imagine their lives and fates.
Scientists squabble over the locations and dates for human arrival in the New World; the first explorers were few, and encampments fleeting.  But at some point between twenty and forty thousand years ago sea levels were low enough that a vast land bridge was exposed between Asia and North America, called Beringia. At the same time, the First People may have been on the move through other ways—evidence has emerged of a seafaring people, moving down the Pacific coast by boat. Over millennia, these early people spread across the continent, and remains of their ancient settlements have been found from Alaska to New Mexico, Florida and Pennsylvania.
The unpeopled continent they reached was inhabited by megafauna—mastodons, sloths, mammoths, saber-toothed cats, lions, bison and enormous bears, far larger than the ones we know today. The First People were both predators and prey, effective hunters (Paleolithic spear points are still encrusted with the protein of their kills) who were also wildly outnumbered and at the mercy of dangerous and much larger animals. Childs reflects on the relationship early humans had to their environment, as one species among many, fighting for survival—a relationship with nature we can hardly imagine today.

About the Author
Craig Childs is known for following ancient migration routes on foot, pursuing early Pueblo passages across the Southwest and most recently the paths of first peoples into the Americas during the Ice Age. He has published more than a dozen books of adventure, wilderness, and science. His new book, Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America, examines the dynamics of people moving into an uninhabited hemisphere in the late Pleistocene, documenting arrivals from Alaska to Florida to southern Chile. He has won the Orion Book Award and has twice won the Sigurd F. Olson Nature Writing Award, the Galen Rowell Art of Adventure Award, and the Spirit of the West Award for his body of work. He is contributing editor at Adventure Journal Quarterly, and his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Men's Journal and Outside. The New York Times says "Childs's feats of asceticism are nothing if not awe inspiring: he's a modern-day desert father." An occasional commentator for NPR's Morning Edition, he teaches writing at University of Alaska in Anchorage and the Mountainview MFA at Southern New Hampshire University.
This community talk is free.

About the Library Author Series
Bud Werner Memorial Library presents an ongoing program of author talks throughout the year. These are free community events held in Library Hall, where a diverse award-winning range of visiting authors speak about their literary works and their writing processes. Each talk is followed by a Q&A and an opportunity to have authors sign copies of their books.

 

 

 

WOMEN CONNECT BOOK CLUB

Off the Beaten Path welcomes the Women Connect book club, an inclusive community group designed to read and discuss books that cover women’s issues or feature strong female protagonists, and to study the works of female authors.

The group is limited to 12 people per meeting and convenes on the second Thursday of the month. 

 

 

 

FRENCH CLUB HAPPY HOUR

Join the local French Club for a celebratory happy hour and discussion of all things French: books, language, food, politics, and travel.

 

 

 

MIRACLE ON BUFFALO PASS SIGNING AT OTBP

Thursday, September 20th 6-8 PM

The word "miracle" is thrown around a lot. But it seems like the right word to use about the crash of Rocky Mountain Airways flight 217. In December, 1978, a passenger plane with 22 people on board left Steamboat Springs for Denver. It went down in a blinding blizzard on Buffalo Pass roughly an hour after take-off. The crash, and the monumental rescue that followed, are the subject of the book,Miracle on Buffalo Pass: Rocky Mountain Airways Flight 217. Join us at Off the Beaten Path for a talk and book signing with rescuer Jerry Alsum and others involved with the crash. Alsum, rescuers and survivors also will be signing books during an upcoming reunion Sept. 21 at The Steamboat Grand.

 

 

 

MIRACLE ON BUFFALO PASS REUNION AT THE STEAMBOAT GRAND

Steamboat Grand

Off the Beaten Path will be bookselling at this years' reunion of survivors and rescuers of the 1978 crash.


The word "miracle" is thrown around a lot. But it seems like the right word to use about the crash of Rocky Mountain Airways flight 217. In December, 1978, a passenger plane with 22 people on board left Steamboat Springs for Denver. It went down in a blinding blizzard on Buffalo Pass roughly an hour after take-off. The crash, and the monumental rescue that followed, are the subject of the book, Miracle on Buffalo Pass: Rocky Mountain Airways Flight 217. Survivors and Rescuers will be signing books during this wonderful reunion, which is open to the public.

 

 

 

AUTHOR JAMES MCLAUGHLIN, BEARSKIN

September 25th at Bud Werner Memorial Library, 6:30 PM

An evening with the author of Bearskin, “one of the year’s most buzzy, fascinating thrillers" (Entertainment Weekly), who writes in the riveting, rugged vein of Smith Henderson, Daniel Woodrell and Annie Proulx — a debut novel fortified with impressive research, breathtaking psychological acuity and addictive plotting.
Bearskin is visceral, raw, and compelling—filled with sights, smells, and sounds truly observed.  It’s a powerful debut and an absolute showcase of exceptional prose.  There are very few first novels when I feel compelled to circle brilliant passages, but James McLaughlin’s writing had me doing just that.” — NYT bestselling author C.J. Box
Haunting....Rendered in remarkable prose....[An] edgy tale, with human greed and wildlife exploitation at its heart.” — Booklist
“[A] twisty, knuckle-gnawing thriller.... Remarkable.... Terrifying.” — Publishers Weekly (Staff Pick—Best of Summer 2018)
Rice Moore is a field researcher by trade and a former smuggler by association. His new job as a caretaker and researcher for the Turk Mountain Forest Preserve in rural Virginia seems ideal, not only for its remote, largely untouched wooded terrain but because it is a perfect hideout from the Mexican drug cartels he betrayed back in Arizona. When Rice finds the carcass of a bear killed by poachers on the reserve, his newly quiet life unravels. As the bear killings continue, Rice partners with his predecessor, a scientist named Sara who remains passionate about her work on the preserve while struggling to overcome the horrific incident that ended her time there. In trying to stop the poaching, Rice finds himself in the hostile crosshairs of the locals, the law, and even his employers. The investigation pushes him into a nationwide criminal network, pulling him back into the deadly past he had hoped never to encounter again.
McLaughlin’s lifelong fascination with what he calls “the unfathomable will of the forest” is enchantingly explored through Rice, whose perceptions become mysteriously affected as he stalks poachers through the preserve. As his investigation deepens, Rice seems to embrace the blurring of the line between man and nature.

About the Author
James McLaughlin’s path to publishing his debut novel at age 54 has been one of fits and starts. While writing has always remained his goal, he’s also co-founded a business and works as a lawyer (both in the realm of land conservation). Inspired by a family member’s roadside encounter with a one-armed mushroom picker who bemoaned the bear poachers he encountered in the forests of rural Virginia, Bearskin has been in stages of development since the mid-1990s. As a novella, it won the 2009 William Peden Prize for best fiction published by The Missouri Review.
McLaughlin holds law and MFA degrees from the University of Virginia. His fiction and essays have appeared in The Missouri Review, The Portland Review, The Clackamas Literary Review and elsewhere. He grew up in rural Virginia and lives in the Wasatch Range east of Salt Lake City.
This community talk is free.

About the Library Author Series
Bud Werner Memorial Library presents an ongoing program of author talks throughout the year. These are free community events held in Library Hall, where a diverse award-winning range of visiting authors speak about their literary works and their writing processes. Each talk is followed by a Q&A and an opportunity to have authors sign copies of their books.

 

 

 

STORYTIME WITH CHILDREN'S AUTHOR CLAUDINE NORDEN & ILLUSTRATOR BONNIE WIEGAND

Saturday, September 29th 1-3 PM

Join us at Off the Beaten Path for a special storytime event with children's author Claudine Norden and illustrator Bonnie Wiegand! Claudine and Bonnie will be here reading and signing their new book, Quigley the Quiet Hedgehog. Quigley is a self-confident, assertive hedgehog who enjoys reading, creating, adventure, friends, and solitude. In a world where the extrovert ideal is celebrated, Quigley stands up for the introvert and demonstrates finding freedom in serenity. Aimed at preschool and elementary aged children, this colorful storybook with hand-painted illustrations encourages the quiet temperment at home, at school, and in social situations. Bring by your little ones and enjoy this event with the whole family!